DASH Diet for People with Hypertension – Weekly Menu

An estimated 1.13 billion people worldwide have Hypertension; two-thirds live in low- and middle-income countries. (1)

In 2015, 1 in 4 men and 1 in 5 women had Hypertension. Hypertension is one of the leading causes of premature death worldwide.

The fundamental causes of high blood pressure are being overweight, a sedentary lifestyle, bad habits (smoking and drinking), and eating an unhealthy diet. In particular, overeating salt and saturated fat. (2)

The American Heart Association has developed an eating plan called the DASH diet to combat this problem.

Read on to find out what it is all about and a weekly DASH diet menu.

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Dash Diet: What is it?

The DASH diet is a nutritional system developed by the US National Institutes of Health for Hypertension. Following this diet helps prevent high blood pressure and reduce the adverse health effects caused by Hypertension.

The abbreviation DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension or dietary approaches to stop Hypertension. The diet was developed by scientists between 1993-and 1997, and several studies confirm its effectiveness in reducing pressure.

According to various US research institutes, along with vegetarian, Nordic, and Mediterranean diets, the DASH diet is one of the top three healthiest diets.

Hypertension – Causes and consequences

First of all, Hypertension is known to damage the heart and cardiovascular system. Excessively high blood pressure leads to loss of elasticity of the artery walls, and it also reduces the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart muscle.

The consequences of Hypertension are arrhythmia, heart failure, angina pectoris, or even cardiac arrest.

Poor nutrition is the most crucial cause of Hypertension. In particular, a diet includes large amounts of salt, saturated fat, and trans fat. And a chronic lack of fruits, vegetables, and plant fiber sources (for example, whole grains).

//Read more:

Saturated Fats – Food List

Trans Fats – What Are They and Why Are They Bad?

Plant Fiber Diet – Sample Weekly Menu

DASH diet rules

The DASH nutrition system recommends limiting salt and animal fats. A typical DASH menu allows fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fat-free dairy products, vegetable fats (in moderation), fish, and other lean meats.

Most simple carbohydrates (sugar, sweets, white bread, cakes, juices), excessively starchy foods (white rice, boiled pasta), animal fatty foods (butter, cheese, lard, sausages), snacks (potatoes) are prohibited. Fried, salted), margarine and mayonnaise.

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How to reduce blood pressure with diet?

To lower blood pressure and avoid the consequences of Hypertension, it is recommended not only to follow a DASH diet or similar meal plans; but also to abandon bad habits, engage in regular physical activity, and control stress levels.

Smoking, drinking alcohol, and excessive caffeine consumption can impair the cardiovascular system, as well as reduce the effects of the stress hormone cortisol. One way to ensure good physical activity is to count the number of steps you walk per day.

// Read more:

How many steps do you have to take per day?

Cortisol is the stress hormone

How to lower bad LDL cholesterol?

DASH diet – weekly menu

The DASH diet is based on the complete exclusion from the diet of excessively salty foods, potato chips, ultra-processed cookies, and other snacks. In addition, it does not allow carbonated drinks either. Remember that even diet sodas contain a significant amount of salt.

Nutrition for hypertensive patients should include whole fruits and vegetables (not in the form of sugar-rich fruit juices), lean meat, and whole grains.

Here’s a sample DASH diet menu.

Day 1

  • Breakfast – Ginger and lemon drink
  • Oatmeal with milk, natural yogurt and berries, and strawberries
  • Lunch – Fish soufflé, aubergines, and tomato paste
  • Green tea.
  • Snack – Cherry Jelly with fruits
  • Dinner – Salad with avocado, kale, cucumber, cherry tomatoes, chia, chickpeas, and steamed shrimp

Day 2

  • Breakfast – Sugar-free granola with raisins, blueberries, chia seeds, and walnuts with almond milk
  • Lunch – Soup with shiitake mushrooms. Haddock in lemongrass and green seasoning. Quinoa table with herbs and vegetables. Red tea
  • Snack – Cranberry fruit drink and whole-wheat toast with lean cheese.
  • Dinner – Salmon with sesame oil, zucchini puree, and roasted vegetables.

Day 3

  • Breakfast – Sugar free granola with raisins, blueberries, chia seeds and walnuts with almond milk
  • Lunch – Soup with shiitake mushrooms. Haddock in lemongrass and green seasoning. Quinoa table with herbs and vegetables. Red tea
  • Snack – Cranberry fruit drink and whole-wheat toast with lean cheese.
  • Dinner – Salmon with sesame oil, zucchini puree and roasted vegetables.

Day 4

  • Breakfast – Oatmeal pancake with green coffee and fruits.
  • Lunch – Baked chicken with bell peppers, brown rice, olive oil, and flax seeds.
  • Snack – Skimmed yogurt with fruits.
  • Dinner – Baked fish with Provencal herbs, blanched vegetables.

Day 4

  • Breakfast – Oatmeal pancake with green coffee and fruits.
  • Lunch – Baked chicken with bell peppers, brown rice, olive oil, and flax seeds.
  • Snack – Skimmed yogurt with fruits.
  • Dinner – Baked fish with Provencal herbs, blanched vegetables.

Day 5

  • Breakfast – Rye bread with green tea and skim cheese.
  • Lunch – Scallops with lemon and rice pilaf with vegetables
  • Snack – Citrus jelly, spicy rosehip drink, three oatmeal cookies.
  • Dinner – Leaf salad with tomato, cucumber, quail egg, and tofu.

Day 6

  • Breakfast – Spelled porridge with almond milk.
  • Lunch – Red lentils with sauteed chicken and vegetables.
  • Snack – Sugar-free coconut cake – cinnamon tea
  • Dinner – Baked sole with lean cheese and tomato slices. Buckwheat salad .

Day 7

  • Breakfast – Banana bread with green tea.
  • Lunch – Hot pumpkin curry soup. Grilled squid and lettuce, cucumber, and cherry tomato salad.
  • Snack – Sugar-free coconut cake – cinnamon tea
  • Dinner – Vegetable omelette with bulgur wheat.

The daily caloric intake from the weekly menu is about 1800 kcal per day. The DASH nutrition program is designed to reduce blood pressure and visceral fat. It is suitable for both men and women.

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ABSTRACT

The DASH diet is a nutrition system for people with Hypertension. It was developed by agencies related to heart health in the United States.

This diet is based on salt, saturated fat, trans fat, and sugar restriction. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat meats are allowed.

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